About

High Green has changed massively in the last 80 years, Scouting has had many uniform changes, and now has new sections like Beaver Scouts.

History of 105th High Green

High Green Scout group was formed in 1926, which back then fell in to the catchment area of Wentworth District (now Don District). Tom Whittaker formed the group, and below are some extracts from Tom’s Early Memories of Scouting.

Tom Whittaker’s Early Memories of Scouting

“I had to leave 148 troop and took on as Cub master with 3rd Wentworth Group Chapeltown. This was successful for a time but the troop moved to Chapeltown from the Tenore and I decided to form High Green Troop, which was registered in May 1926. The Tensore was a field of old iron stone mines with a stone building in the middle which had been the home of a long extinct troop of militanen, but as it was owned by Newton Chambers, it was rent free. Mr. Newton Drew, the managing director, …. kindly laid on works and we had electrical lighting and had improvements on lamps and candles.”

So why a mucky gray neckerchief?

“I was accused of copying the Gilwell scarf… as we called them then, but this was only true by accident. My feeling was for a single colour, not too obtrusive when playing tracking games such as “Bob up” in the woods, and the general poverty around contributed to the rest. It should be noted that this was 1925 when miners were looked out and so many could not afford the extra clothes represented by Scout uniform.”

How were the neckers made?

“Twill bedsheets which had become “more holy than righteous” down the middle, still cut up in to 8 or 10 scarves… These were then boiled in an army dirie with several blue paper bags which were always used to supply sugar, and they came out grey.

If we could have dyed them bright green it would have fitted the war cry or trybal yell…
“Is it red – Muff Said,
Is it blue – Sez said,
It’s green – High Green”.

high_green_scouts_with_scoutmaster_eric_gale_1953

The picture above shows High Green Scouts with their Scoutmaster Eric Gale in 1953.

High Green in the 21st Centaury

So, what’s changed?

Quite a lot, you ‘de be surprised. There are now more than 28 million Scouts all over the world meeting in 216 countries. Scouting is an internationally recognised organisation for boys and girls, in this country aged between 6 and 25. At 18 you can become an adult leader, and/or; you can join Scout Active support, which is in place to support Scouting at a number of different levels.

So back to home, at High Green the group now meets in its own headquarters based on Packhorse Lane in our worn yet functional Scout hut. Wenow have two Beaver colonies, a Cub pack and Scout troop. Girls have been Scouting for the last decade which is starting to be reflected at 105th.

The main framework of Scouting though has always stayed the same, but activities are now regulated in a safe environment that still enables youngsters to have a great time. Each section meets weekly and takes part in many other activities out of the hut, from camping, to water sports weekends, go-kart racing and many more exciting activities.